Israel Information
    Name State of Israel (מְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל)
    Capital City Jerusalem
    Largest Cities Jerusalem | Tel Aviv | Haifa
    Currency New shekel (ILS)
    Official languages Hebrew | Arabic
    Population 8.5 million (rank: 97)
    Area 20,770 km2 / 8,019 mile2 (rank: 149)
    Population density 392 per km2 / 1.015 per mile2 (rank: 34)
    Anthem Hatikvah ("The Hope")
    Legislature Knesset
    Highest point Har Meron (1,208 m)
    Lowest point Dead Sea (-408 m)
    Longest river Jordan River
    Largest lake Sea of Galilee
    Coastline 273 km
    Borders Egypt 208 km, Gaza Strip 59 km, Jordan 307 km, Lebanon 81 km, Syria 83 km, West Bank 330 km
    Median Age 30 years
    Population data Growth rate: 1.53% | Birth rate: 1.83% | Death rate: 0.52%
    Life expectancy 82.4 years (Males: 80.6 years | Female: 84.4 years)
    Literacy rate 98% (Male: 99% | Female: 97%)
    GDP (PPP) $297 billion (Per capita: $34,800)
    Busiest airport Ben Gurion Airport (TLV), Tel Aviv
    Calling code +972
    Internet TLD .il (.ישראל)
    Independence 14 May 1948
    Flag carrier El Al
    President Reuven Rivlin
    Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu
    Time now
    Israel facts
    Israel facts
    The State of Israel is a country in the Middle East, on the southeastern shore of the Mediterranean Sea and the northern shore of the Red Sea. David Ben-Gurion declared the establishment of the State of Israel on 14 May 1948 and Tel Aviv became the capital of Israel. On 5 December 1949, Israel's first Prime Minister, David Ben-Gurion, proclaimed Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Many countries still maintain their embassies in Tel Aviv


    Amazing Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel has land borders with Lebanon to the north, Syria to the northeast, Jordan on the east, the Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to the east and west, respectively, and Egypt to the southwest. Israel shares 1,068 km of land border with its six neighbors (Egypt 208 km, Gaza Strip 59 km, Jordan 307 km, Lebanon 81 km, Syria 83 km, West Bank 330 km)


    Israel National Symbols
    National Bird Hoopoe
    National Colors Blue and white
    National Dog Canaan Dog
    National Flower Anemone coronaria
    National Tree Olive
    Israel fun facts
    Israel facts
    Judaism is the majority religion in Israel. The followers of Judaism are called Jews or Jewish people. Jews believe that Abraham is their patriarch. According to the Old Testament of the Bible, Jacob, the grandson of Abraham, was given the name 'Israel' (meaning 'one who struggles with God') after he wrestled an entire night with an angel of the God. Jacob's 12 sons, referred to as 'B’nai Israel' (meaning 'the children of Israel') in the first chapter of the book of Exodus, became the ancestors of the Israelites. These 12 sons of Jacob, also known as the Twelve Tribes of Israel, formed the Kingdom of Israel. Jacob and his sons had lived in Canaan (present day Israel) but were forced by famine to migrate into Egypt for four generations, lasting 430 years, until Moses, a great-great grandson of Jacob, led the Israelites back into Canaan during the 'Exodus'



Israel Currency: New shekel (₪) (ILS)
Israel Currency
    Cool Israel facts
    Israel flag
    As per 2015 estimate, Israel's population is about 8 million. About 75% of this population are Jews and Arabs Muslims make up about 21% of the population. Israel was established as a homeland for the Jewish people. The country's Law of Return grants all Jews and those of Jewish ancestry the right to Israeli citizenship. Israel is relatively a young nation with the median age of its population hovering around 30 year. Israel was ranked 34th in population density (388 people per sq. km)



Israel Coat of Arms
Israel Seal
    Amazing Israel facts
    Israel is a parliamentary democracy with universal suffrage (all citizens aged 18 years or above are eligible to vote) The prime minister is the head of government and head of the cabinet. Israel is governed by a 120-member parliament, known as the Knesset. A member of parliament supported by a parliamentary majority becomes the prime minister. Membership of the Knesset is based on proportional representation of political parties, with a 3.25% electoral threshold. The president of Israel is head of state, with limited and largely ceremonial duties. Parliamentary elections are scheduled every four years, but unstable coalitions or a no-confidence vote by the Knesset can dissolve a government earlier.



    Cool Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel has a three-tier court system. At the lowest level are magistrate courts, situated in most cities across the country. Above them are district courts, serving as both appellate courts and courts of first instance; they are situated in five of Israel's six districts. The third and highest tier is the Supreme Court, located in Jerusalem; it serves a dual role as the highest court of appeals and the High Court of Justice. In the latter role, the Supreme Court rules as a court of first instance, allowing individuals, both citizens and non-citizens, to petition against the decisions of state authorities.



    Administrative districts
    Israel is divided into six main administrative districts, known as mehozot (singular: mahoz)
    Northern
    Haifa
    Tel Aviv
    Central
    Jerusalem
    Southern
    In addition to these six districts, Judea and Samaria Area (the West Bank excluding East Jerusalem) is officially regarded by Israel as one of its administrative regions. Districts are further divided into fifteen sub-districts known as nafot (singular: nafa), which are themselves partitioned into fifty natural regions. For statistical purposes, the country is divided into three metropolitan areas: Tel Aviv metropolitan area (population 3,206,400), Haifa metropolitan area (population 1,021,000), and Beer Sheva metropolitan area (population 559,700). Israel's largest municipality is Jerusalem with 773,800 residents in an area of 126 square kilometres (49 sq mi). Israeli government statistics on Jerusalem include the population and area of East Jerusalem, which is widely recognized as part of the Palestinian territories under Israeli occupation.



    Top 10 cities of Israel by population
    Jerusalem (849,800)
    Tel Aviv (426,100)
    Haifa (277,100)
    Rishon LeZion (240,700)
    Petah Tikva (225,400)
    Ashdod (218,000)
    Netanya (202,400)
    Beersheba (201,100)
    Holon (187,300)
    Bnei Brak (178,300)



    Cool Israel facts
    Israel facts
    The first Kingdom of Israel was established around the 11th century BCE. Around 930 BCE, the kingdom split into a southern Kingdom of Judah and a northern Kingdom of Israel. In 722 BCE, Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III invaded Israel and destroyed its capital, Samaria. In 586 BCE King Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon conquered Judah, destroyed Solomon's Temple and exiled the Jews to Babylon. In 538 BCE, Cyrus the Great of Persia conquered Babylon and took over its empire and freed the people of Judah. According to the Hebrew Bible 50,000 Judeans, led by Zerubabel, returned to Judah and rebuilt the temple. A conflict between Judeans and Greeks erupted in 167 BCE with the Maccabean Revolt, which succeeded in establishing an independent Hasmonean Kingdom in Judah, which later expanded over much of modern Israel. The Roman Empire invaded the region in 63 BCE and Judea transformed into a Roman province, became the site of a violent struggle of Jews against Greco-Romans, culminating in the Jewish-Roman Wars, ending in wide-scale destruction, expulsions, and genocide. Later the region came under Byzantine rule. After the Persian conquest and the installation of a short-lived Jewish Commonwealth in 614 CE, the Byzantine Empire reconquered the country in 628. In 634–641 CE, the region, including Jerusalem, was conquered by the Arabs who had just recently adopted Islam. It remained under Muslim control for the next 1,300 years under various dynasties - Rashidun Caliphs, Umayyads, Abbasids, Fatimids, Seljuks, Crusaders, and Ayyubids. The the area was conquered in 1260 by the Mamluk sultans of Egypt. In 1516, the region was conquered by the Ottoman Empire and it remained under Turkish rule until the end of the First World War, when Britain defeated the Ottoman forces and set up a military administration across the former Ottoman Syria. In 1920 the territory was divided between Britain and France under the mandate system, and the British-administered area which included modern day Israel was named Mandatory Palestine. The first wave of modern Jewish migration to Ottoman-ruled Palestine, known as the First Aliyah, began in 1881, as Jews fled pogroms in Eastern Europe. Austro-Hungarian journalist Theodor Herzl founded political Zionism, a movement which sought to establish a Jewish state in the Land of Israel. In 1896, Herzl published Der Judenstaat (The State of the Jews), offering his vision of a future Jewish state; the following year he presided over the first Zionist Congress. During World War I, British Foreign Secretary Arthur Balfour sent the Balfour Declaration of 1917 to Baron Rothschild, a leader of the British Jewish community, that stated that Britain intended for the creation of a Jewish "national home" within the Palestinian Mandate. The Jewish Legion, a group primarily of Zionist volunteers, assisted, in 1918, in the British conquest of Palestine. In 1922, the League of Nations granted Britain a mandate over Palestine under terms which included the Balfour Declaration with its promise to the Jews, and with similar provisions regarding the Arab Palestinians. The population of the area at the end of First World War was predominantly Arab and Muslim, with Jews accounting for about 11%, and Arab Christians at about 10% of the population. The rise of Nazism and the increasing persecution of Jews led to an influx of a quarter of a million Jews to the region. By the end of World War II, the Jewish population of Palestine had increased to 33% of the total population. After World War II, Britain found itself in intense conflict with the Jewish community as well as the Arab community. In 1947, the British government announced it would withdraw from Mandatory Palestine, stating it was unable to arrive at a solution acceptable to both Arabs and Jews. On 15 May 1947, the General Assembly of the newly formed United Nations resolved that a committee, United Nations Special Committee on Palestine (UNSCOP), be created "to prepare a report on the question of Palestine". In the Report of the Committee dated 3 September 1947 to the UN General Assembly, the majority of the Committee proposed a plan to replace the British Mandate with "an independent Arab State, an independent Jewish State, and the City of Jerusalem under an International Trusteeship System". The Jewish community accepted the plan, but the Arabs rejected it and indicated that they would reject any other plan of partition. On the following day, 1 December 1947, the Arab gangs began attacking Jewish community. The Jews were initially on the defensive as civil war broke out, but in early April 1948 moved onto the offensive. The Arab Palestinian economy collapsed and 250,000 Palestinian Arabs fled or were expelled. On 14 May 1948, the day before the expiration of the British Mandate, David Ben-Gurion, the head of the Jewish Agency, declared "the establishment of a Jewish state in Eretz-Israel, to be known as the State of Israel". The following day, the armies of four Arab countries — Egypt, Syria, Transjordan (peresent day Jordan) and Iraq — entered what had been British Mandatory Palestine, launching the 1948 Arab–Israeli War. Soon, contingents from Yemen, Morocco, Saudi Arabia and Sudan joined the war. Arab leaders talked about driving the Jews into the sea. After a year of fighting, a ceasefire was declared and temporary borders, known as the Green Line, were established. Jordan annexed what became known as the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and Egypt took control of the Gaza Strip. The United Nations estimated that more than 700,000 Palestinians were expelled by or fled from advancing Israeli forces during the conflict — what would become known in Arabic as the Nakba ("catastrophe") Israel was admitted as a member of the United Nations by majority vote on 11 May 1949. Arab nationalists led by Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser refused to recognize Israel, and called for its destruction. In May 1967, Egypt massed its army near the border with Israel, expelled UN peacekeepers, stationed in the Sinai Peninsula since 1957, and blocked Israel's access to the Red Sea. On 5 June 1967, Israel launched a pre-emptive strike against Egypt. Jordan, Syria and Iraq responded and attacked Israel. In a Six-Day War, Israel defeated Jordan and captured the West Bank, defeated Egypt and captured the Gaza Strip and Sinai Peninsula, and defeated Syria and captured the Golan Heights. Jerusalem's boundaries were enlarged, incorporating East Jerusalem, and the 1949 Green Line became the administrative boundary between Israel and the occupied territories. On 6 October 1973, as Jews were observing Yom Kippur, the Egyptian and Syrian armies launched a surprise attack against Israeli forces in the Sinai Peninsula and Golan Heights, that opened the Yom Kippur War. The war ended on 26 October with Israel successfully repelling Egyptian and Syrian forces. In 1992, Yitzhak Rabin became Prime Minister following an election in which his party called for compromise with Israel's neighbors. The following year, Shimon Peres on behalf of Israel, and Mahmoud Abbas for the Palestinian Liberation Organization (PLO), signed the Oslo Accords, which gave the Palestinian National Authority the right to govern parts of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The PLO also recognized Israel's right to exist and pledged an end to terrorism, a promise they failed to keep.



    Interesting Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel has a technologically advanced free market economy. Cut diamonds, high-technology equipment, and pharmaceuticals are among its leading exports. Its major imports include crude oil, grains, raw materials, and military equipment. Israel is considered the most advanced country in Southwest Asia and the Middle East in economic and industrial development. It has the second-largest number of startup companies in the world (after the United States) and the largest number of NASDAQ-listed companies outside North America. In 2010, Israel ranked 17th among the world's most economically developed nations, according to IMD's World Competitiveness Yearbook. Days of working time in Israel are Sunday through Thursday (for a five-day workweek), or Friday (for a six-day workweek). In observance of Shabbat, in places where Friday is a work day and the majority of population is Jewish, Friday is a "short day", usually lasting till 14:00 in the winter, or 16:00 in the summer.



    Cool Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Not dead anymore
    Hebrew is one of the two official languages of Israel. It is the only language to be revived into a national language in all of world history. Hebrew had previously been a dead language not spoken for centuries.
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Oldest cemetery

    Israel is home to the oldest, continually used cemetery in the world. Tours of The Mount of Olives in Jerusalem run daily for those interested in visiting the historical site.
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    On Yom Kippur, one of the most holy days for Jews, Israel shuts down. Traffic is nonexistent and by law, all stores must be closed. Radio and TV is also suspended.
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    In 1952, Albert Einstein was offered the position of President of Israel. The famous scientist turned down the position.
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    The biblical Dead Sea Scrolls are located in Israel’s Jerusalem Museum. The manuscripts are known as the original version of the Hebrew Bible
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    Haifa’s Carmelit transport system is one of the smallest subway systems in the world, with four carriages and a track of just 1.8 km.
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    Israel has the highest number of museums per capita in the world.
Current weather in Tel Aviv (°F)
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    Rabbis of Israel have recently ruled that giraffe is kosher, meaning giraffe meat and milk are acceptable for observant Jews. But who is tall enough to milk a giraffe!!
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    Israeli citizens generally buy car insurance which doesn’t cover Saturdays, making it cheaper as they do not drive on Saturdays!
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel

    Israel was the first country to ban underweight models from catwalks
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Israel
    El Al Israel Airlines is the flag carrier of Israel. It holds the world record for the greatest number of passengers ever carried by a commercial airliner. During Operation Solomon, which involved the evacuation of Ethiopian Jews from Ethiopia, an El Al Boeing 747 took off from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia with 1,086 passengers and landed in Israel with 1,088 passengers (two babies born on the flight)
    Fun Israel facts
    Israel facts
    Letters to God
    Every year the Letters to God department of the Israeli postal service receives more than 1,000 letters addressed to 'God, Jerusalem' They are opened, folded and, in a ceremony overseen by a senior rabbi, squeezed into the cracks of the Western Wall, in Jerusalem's Old City.
    Amazing Israel facts
    World Heritage Sites in Israel
    The UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) has designated 9 World Heritage Sites in Israel.
    1. Bahá’i Holy Places in Haifa and the Western Galilee
    2. Biblical Tels - Megiddo, Hazor, Beer Sheba
    3. Incense Route – Desert Cities in the Negev
    4. Masada
    5. Old City of Acre
    6. White City of Tel-Aviv—the Modern Movement
    7. Sites of Human Evolution at Mount Carmel: The Nahal Me’arot / Wadi el-Mughara Caves
    8. Caves of Maresha and Bet-Guvrin in the Judean Lowlands as a Microcosm of the Land of the Caves
    9. Necropolis of Bet She’arim: A Landmark of Jewish Renewal
    Israel facts
    National Anthem of Israel
    "Hatikvah" ("The Hope") is the national anthem of Israel. Its lyrics are adapted from a poem by Naftali Herz Imber, a Jewish poet from Zolochiv in Austrian Poland, today part of the Ukraine. Imber's nine-stanza poem, Tikvatenu ("Our Hope"), put into words his thoughts and feelings following the establishment of Petah Tikva (literally "Opening of Hope"). Published in Imber's first book Barkai [The Shining Morning Star], the poem was subsequently adopted as an anthem by the Hovevei Zion and later by the Zionist Movement at the First Zionist Congress in 1897.


    Israel facts

    Israel facts

    underwater museum

    Israel is home to the only underwater museum in the world. In Caesarea, you’re able to dive through the underwater ruins of the ancient city.

    More Facts